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Humanities

History

Introduction

History can mean two things: the past and the study of the past. The past influences all our lives. It shapes the customs and beliefs of the communities to which we belong. Learning about the past and methods used to study it helps children make sense of the world in which they live.

  • To allow for more clarity in links across the whole school curriculum.
  • To develop relevant skills which permeate through all subjects.

Aims

Our aim in history is to give as much opportunity as possible for children to have empathy with the world around them; whether this be in the past, present or future. History is not a static area, but alive and breathing; continually shifting between opinions. The study of history should encourage the development of this understanding, leading to open-minded views of cause and effect. This approach also stimulates intellectual skills, engaging children’s minds on why something changed rather than what changed.

Pupils are encouraged to develop:

  • an awareness of the world around them.
  • an understanding of attitudes, actions, ideas and beliefs.
  • an interest in the past.

We should also seek to encourage pupils to develop the following skills:

  • empathy.
  • interpretation of secondary and primary sources.
  • historical enquiry.
  • communicating history dramatically, verbally and narratively.
  • research

Content

The History curriculum at Three Ways School is drawn from the National Curriculum and QCA guidelines.

Method and Organisation

History is mainly taught as a series of units across Key Stages 1-3. Each year group receives one session of History each week for three out of six terms, alternating with Geography . The units at KS3 are taught in chronological order, in KS1 & 2 this is not possible because of mixed age classes, and therefore the units have been chosen to cover the National Curriculum six areas of study. Good historical practice will first be associated with experiences within the local area, which builds upon pupils’ real life hands on experiences of evidence and enables them to develop both understanding and skills. Due to curriculum commitments KS4 and Sixth Form study History as an integral part of their life skills programme.

Throughout the key stages, planning should allow children to be encouraged to develop:

  • historical knowledge
  • historical skills
  • an understanding of attitudes, actions, ideas and beliefs that helped to shape the past.

All pupils will receive the same experiences, but care will be taken to ensure that activities are appropriate to pupils level of skill and understanding.

Record keeping is essential to ensure progression in historical skills and experiences through appropriate programmes of study. Due to the nature of the History programme of study and scheme of work, a good proportion of study involves hands-on real experiences. As a result, photographic evidence is invaluable for recording learning as it occurs.

Cross Curricular Links

As with other aspects of the curriculum, elements of history may interrelate with work done in other subject areas, at all key stages. Staff will endeavour to make the most of these opportunities.

Assessment Recording and Reporting

The class teacher is responsible for the actual planning and recording of history as it occurs each week. Pupil progress should be monitored through observations and by using planning, learning objectives and ‘B’ squared data. This information is then used to report to the senior management team, the co-ordinator and parents, via P levels, curriculum record and planning sheets, annual reviews and IEP’s. Information gained is also used to inform future planning for current as well as new teachers.

Geography

Geography is an integral part of the curriculum at Three Ways School, as it combines not only the concepts outlined in the National Curriculum, but also underlines many of the independence skills that we aim to foster in all our pupils.

Geography helps pupils to develop an understanding of their environment. It relates to many aspects of the pupil’s own life and the world in which they live, being concerned in the first instance and their immediate surroundings and going to extend their interests and knowledge beyond their direct experiences.

Aims

Geographical studies should help pupils to:

  • Become aware of their immediate environment and their place within it.
  • Explore the relationship between people and environments.
  • Develop a range of skills necessary to carry out geographical enquiry and to interpret geographical information, i.e. Fieldwork, map work and enquiry, including techniques of clear, logical and accurate thought.
  • Develop knowledge and understanding about physical processes relating to weather, river, seas, oceans and landforms-how and why landscapes develop.
  • Develop a sense of responsibility for the environment, including conservation and the effect that man can have upon it.
  • To show that information can be communicated by the use of maps, plans, graphs and diagrams.

Content

The geography curriculum at Three Ways School is drawn from the National Curriculum and QCA guidelines and Equals Scheme.

At Key Stage 4 MLD students will take an Entry Level exam in this subject.

Method and Organisation

Geography is mainly taught as a series of units across Key Stages 1-3. Each year group receives one session of Geography each week for three out of six terms, alternating with History. Good geographical practice will first be associated with experiences within the local area, which builds upon pupils’ real life hands on experiences and enables them to develop both understanding and skills. Due to other curriculum commitments KS4 and Sixth Form study Geography as an integral part of their life skills programme. However Entry Level Geography is offered to some classes.

Throughout the key stages, planning should allow for the integration of:

Geographical skills

Places

Thematic studies

All pupils will receive the same experiences, but care will be taken to ensure that activities are appropriate to the pupils level of skill and understanding.

Record keeping is essential to ensure progression in geographical skills and experiences through appropriate programmes of study. Due to the nature of the geography programme of study and scheme of work, a good proportion of study involves hands-on real experiences. As a result, photographic evidence is invaluable for recording learning as it occurs.

Cross Curricular Links

As with other aspects of the curriculum, many elements of geography interrelate strongly with work in other subject area at all key stages.

Many classroom routines and everyday events lend themselves to the development of geographical ideas all staff will endeavour to make the most of these opportunities.

Assessment Recording and Reporting

The class teacher is responsible for the actual planning and recording of geography as it occurs each week. Pupil’s progress should be monitored through observations and by using planning and learning objectives. This information is then used to record progress. Information gained is used to inform future planning for current as well as new teachers.